Appendix:Bibliography

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A partial listing of the works of Norman Doyle-Rice.

Beast Men of NUM (1932)

First novel of the NUM series, set in the Sultanate of Cinnabar in the land of Khitai. Introduced the then-shocking themes of unabashed sexuality, sexual dominance and submission, and anthropomorphic zoophilia, which would recur throughout the NUM series.

Artifacts of NUM (1936)

First appearance of the Kohl Badeen, and the first brief allusion to Cities of the Dead.

Ice Slave of NUM (1938)

First appearance of the Thracians and the Symerians. First novel of the "Ice Cycle" trilogy, which traces the adventures of Tyree of Lycaea from her youth as a slave girl in Symeria to her being crowned Queen of the Lycaeans.

Invaders of NUM (1942)

First appearance of the Ilwraithe.

Priestess of NUM (1943)

First appearance of Megan Blackshield, priestess of Uzzah.

Ice Queen of NUM (1948)

Second novel of the "Ice Cycle" trilogy, which traces the adventures of Tyree of Lycaea from her youth as a slave girl in Symeria to her being crowned Queen of the Lycaeans.

First appearance of the Alates.

Ice Ships of NUM (1949)

Third and final novel of the "Ice Cycle" trilogy, which traces the adventures of Tyree of Lycaea from her youth as a slave girl in Symeria to her being crowned Queen of the Lycaeans.

Slave-Soldiers of NUM (1952)

First appearance of the Dralls. First story in the "Chronicles of Ill Omen", featuring the Drall slave-soldier Ill Omen, one of Doyle-Rice's most complex and popular protagonists.

Obelisk of NUM (1954)

First appearance of the Saar.

War Gods of NUM (1956)

First appearance of the Numina, the gods of NUM (although various gods, including Uzzah, Skudra, and Vayu, had appeared as early as Artifacts of NUM, 1936), this is the first appearance of the Numina as an actual pantheon). First novel of the "Gods of NUM" trilogy, which tells of the rise and fall of the cunning Kohl Badeen warlord and mystic, Aziz Tahrunar.

Outlaw of NUM (1957)

Second in the "Chronicles of Ill Omen".

Earth Gods of NUM (1958)

Second novel of the "Gods of NUM" trilogy, which tells of the rise and fall of the cunning Kohl Badeen warlord and mystic, Aziz Tahrunar.

Star Gods of NUM (1959)

Third and final novel of the "Gods of NUM" trilogy, which tells of the rise and fall of the cunning Kohl Badeen warlord and mystic, Aziz Tahrunar.

War Dancers of NUM (1963)

First appearance of the Khul, and third book of the "Chronicles of Ill Omen". Introduced the Ilwraithe sorcerer Tang Zan. The stern but honorable Ill Omen and the wise but lecherous Tang Zan were perfect foils for each other, and the pair immediately became the most popular characters of the NUM series.

Nomads of NUM (1965)

Fourth novel of the "Chronicles of Ill Omen".

Assassins of NUM (1968)

First appearance of the Scythians (although they had been mentioned as early as Invaders of NUM, 1942), this novel marks the first appearance of a Scythian in the series), the Crimson Dancers, and the Geheren.

Berserkers of NUM (1970)

Fifth novel of the "Chronicles of Ill Omen".

Weaponsmith of NUM (1971)

Sixth novel of the "Chronicles of Ill Omen". The first actual depiction of the Cities of the Dead.

Spice Girls of NUM (1976)

First novel of the "Slave Girl" trilogy, which tells the adventures of the Zinjan slave girl Julianna Fire Eyes.

This was the first NUM novel written after Norman Doyle-Rice's stroke in July, 1971. Although we now know that the novel was in fact written by Doyle-Rice, critics of the time suspected Doyle-Rice had used a ghostwriter. Unlike Doyle-Rice's earlier work, Spice Girls of NUM is formulaic and predictable, and sexually explicit passages with no relevance to the plot appear to have been included merely to appeal to readers' prurient interests. In many places, Doyle-Rice seems to have simply plagiarized his earlier "Ice Cycle" novels. The "Slave Girl" trilogy is generally considered the low point of Doyle-Rice's career.

Slave Dancer of NUM (1978)

Second novel of the "Slave Girl" trilogy, which tells the adventures of the Zinjan slave girl Julianna Fire Eyes.

Halfbreed of NUM (1978)

Third and final novel of the "Slave Girl" trilogy, which tells the adventures of the Zinjan slave girl Julianna Fire Eyes.

Doyle-Rice objected to the publication of this novel, and he actually bought several hundred thousand copies in an effort to prevent people from reading it. This had the perverse effect of placing Halfbreed of NUM on the New York Times' best seller list, and it made both Doyle-Rice and Stone Mountain Publishing enormous amounts of money. However, the book was and is the most universally despised of all of Doyle-Rice's novels: one critic said that it was "an atrocious train wreck of a novel, even when compared to the heart-breakingly awful Spice Girls of NUM."

Oracle of NUM (1979)

Second appearance of Megan Blackshield, priestess of Uzzah. Oracle of NUM shines in stark contrast to the "Slave Girl" trilogy. It is inventive, engrossing, and every erotic passage is essential to the story. It sold nearly as well as Halfbreed of NUM, and silenced those critics who thought Norman Doyle-Rice's literary career had ended.

Death Cult of NUM (1983)

First appearance of the Kazarani (although they had been mentioned as early as Outlaw of NUM, 1957), this novel marks the first appearance of a Kazarani in the series). Seventh (and widely considered the best) novel of the "Chronicles of Ill Omen".

Lost City of NUM (1985)

Third appearance of Megan Blackshield, priestess of Uzzah.

Conquest of NUM (1985)

First (and only) appearance of the Khul warlord Rannen. Rannen is both more sympathetic and more ruthless than Aziz Tahrunar (of the "Gods of NUM" trilogy), and readers are shocked when Rannen dies tragically at the end of the novel. Conquest of NUM wins both the Hugo and Nebula awards for best fantasy novel, and Norman Doyle-Rice is awarded a Nebula Lifetime Achievement Award.

Catacombs of NUM (1986)

A collection of short stories set in NUM, all of which somehow feature the enigmatic Cities of the Dead. The short story collection was met with a mixed reception, and was thought by some of Doyle-Rice's critics to be "too experimental".

Witch Kings of NUM (1991) (with September Bereft)

Fourth and final appearance of Megan Blackshield, priestess of Uzzah. Megan Blackshield is one of only two recurring characters to have appeared in more than three of Norman Doyle-Rice's books (the other being the Drall slave-soldier, Ill Omen), leading some to suspect that September Bereft wrote the majority of Witch Kings of NUM. The style, however, is pure Doyle-Rice, and quite unlike Bereft's later work.